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Clinical Research Article

Korean J Pain 2021; 34(4): 487-500

Published online October 1, 2021 https://doi.org/10.3344/kjp.2021.34.4.487

Copyright © The Korean Pain Society.

Erector spinae plane block for spinal surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Xiao Liang1 , Weilong Zhou2 , Yuchao Fan3

1Department of Anesthesiology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
2Department of Infection Control, West China Second University Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, China
3Department of Anesthesiology, Sichuan Cancer Center, Sichuan Cancer Hospital & Institute, School of Medicine, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan, China

Correspondence to:Yuchao Fan
Department of Anesthesiology, Sichuan Cancer Center, Sichuan Cancer Hospital & Institute, School of Medicine, University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan, China
Tel: +8618040303849
Fax: +85267087
E-mail: yuchaofan_pain@126.com

Handling Editor: Hyun Kang

Received: May 19, 2021; Revised: June 30, 2021; Accepted: July 14, 2021

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Background: Although the erector spinae plane block has been used in various truncal surgical procedures, its clinical benefits in patients undergoing spinal surgery remain controversial. The aim of this meta-analysis was to evaluate the clinical benefits of erector spinae plane block in patients undergoing spinal surgery.
Methods: We searched the Cochrane Library, PubMed, EMBASE, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure for randomized controlled trials comparing the erector spinae plane block with a nonblocked control for spinal surgery.
Results: Twelve studies encompassing 696 subjects were included in our systematic review and meta-analysis. We found that the erector spinae plane block decreased postoperative pain scores and opioid consumption in the postoperative and intraoperative periods. Moreover, it prolonged the time to the first rescue analgesic, reduced the number of patients who required rescue analgesia, and lowered the incidence of postoperative nausea and vomiting. However, it did not exhibit efficacy in decreasing the incidence of urinary retention and itching or shortening the length of hospital stays, or the time to first ambulation.
Conclusions: Erector spinae plane block improves analgesic efficacy among patients undergoing spinal surgery compared with nonblocked controls; however, there is insufficient evidence regarding the benefits of erector spinae plane block for rapid recovery.

Keywords: Analgesia, Analgesics, Opioid, Diskectomy, Enhanced Recovery After Surgery, Erector Spinae Plane Block, Laminectomy, Meta-Analysis, Nerve Block, Neurosurgical Procedures, Pain, Postoperative, Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting, Randomized Controlled Trial.