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Original Article

The Korean Journal of Pain 2020; 33(1): 23-29

Published online January 1, 2020 https://doi.org/10.3344/kjp.2020.33.1.23

Copyright © The Korean Pain Society.

The effect of human mesenchymal stem cell injection on pain behavior in chronic post-ischemia pain mice

Sie Hyeon Yoo1 , Sung Hyun Lee2 , Seunghwan Lee3 , Jae Hong Park3 , Seunghyeon Lee4 , Heecheol Jin4 , and Hue Jung Park3

1Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Cheonan Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan, Korea
2Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Kangbuk Samsung Hospital, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
3Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea
4Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon, Korea

Correspondence to:Hue Jung Park
Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 06591, Korea
Tel: +82-2-2258-2236
Fax: +82-2-537-1951
E-mail: huejung@catholic.ac.kr

Received: July 15, 2019; Revised: October 29, 2019; Accepted: November 1, 2019

This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background

Neuropathic pain (NP) is considered a clinically incurable condition despite various treatment options due to its diverse causes and complicated disease mechanisms. Since the early 2000s, multipotent human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) have been used in the treatment of NP in animal models. However, the effects of hMSC injections have not been studied in chronic post-ischemia pain (CPIP) mice models. Here, we investigated whether intrathecal (IT) and intrapaw (IP) injections of hMSCs can reduce mechanical allodynia in CPIP model mice.

Methods

Seventeen CPIP C57/BL6 mice were selected and randomized into four groups: IT sham (n = 4), IT stem (n = 5), IP sham (n = 4), and IP stem (n = 4). Mice in the IT sham and IT stem groups received an injection of 5 μL saline and 2 × 104 hMSCs, respectively, while mice in the IP sham and IP stem groups received an injection of 5 μL saline and 2 × 105 hMSCs, respectively. Mechanical allodynia was assessed using von Frey filaments from pre-injection to 30 days post-injection. Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) expression in the spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia were also evaluated.

Results

IT and IP injections of hMSCs improved mechanical allodynia. GFAP expression was decreased on day 25 post-injection compared with the sham group. Injections of hMSCs improved allodynia and GFAP expression was decreased compared with the sham group.

Conclusions

These results suggested that hMSCs may be also another treatment modality in NP model by ischemia-reperfusion.

Keywords: Ganglia, Spinal, Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein, Hyperalgesia, Mesenchymal Stromal Cells, Mice, Neuralgia, Reperfusion Injury, Spinal Cord, Stem Cells