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Editorial

Korean J Pain 2019; 32(1): 1-2

Published online January 28, 2019 https://doi.org/10.3344/kjp.2019.32.1.1

Copyright © The Korean Pain Society.

The role and position of antipsychotics in managing chronic pain

Young Hoon Kim*

Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea.

Correspondence to: Young Hoon Kim. Department of Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, 222 Banpo-daero, Seocho-gu, Seoul 06591, Korea. Tel: +82-2-2258-1330, Fax: +82-2-537-1951, anekyh@catholic.ac.kr

Received: December 11, 2018; Accepted: December 12, 2018

References

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  3. Seidel, S, Aigner, M, Ossege, M, Pernicka, E, Wildner, B, Sycha, T. Antipsychotics for acute and chronic pain in adults. Cochrane Database Syst Rev.
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